Paraphernalia

ascii pr0n archive

C-64 charset logo generator: Using fonts ripped from lots of Commodore 64 demos of old, you can now add some 8 bit fun and frolics to your products. Simply choose a font, type in your texts, change colours as needed and save a PNG of your logo in either real resolution or double size.

Christopher Johnson's ASCII Art Collection: Christopher Johnson's ASCII Art Collection was revealed to the Internet in November of 1994, back when Netscape 1.0 was “soooo much better than Mosaic” and Internet Explorer didn't exist yet. Can you believe it? 24 years later, and and this site is still here!

cool-retro-term: cool-retro-term is a terminal emulator which mimics the look and feel of the old cathode tube screens. It has been designed to be eye-candy, customizable, and reasonably lightweight.

Collapse OS: Winter is coming and Collapse OS aims to soften the blow. It is a z80 kernel and a collection of programs, tools and documentation that allows you to assemble an OS that can: Run on minimal and improvised machines. Interface through improvised means (serial, keyboard, display). Edit text files. Compile assembler source files for a wide range of MCUs and CPUs. Read and write from a wide range of storage devices. Replicate itself.

Docubyte - Guide to Computing: A visual history of computing .1945-1979.

Docubyte - I am a computer: Icons of beige.

ELIZA Talking: «E.L.I.Z.A. Talking» is a project to explore the capabilities of client-side speech I/O in modern browsers. The project features Joseph Weizenbaum's famous ELIZA program, which demoed the thrills of a natural language conversation with a computer for the very first time. Joseph Weizenbaum (1923–2008) was an important pioneer in computer technologies and became later well known for his critique of technological progress. His program is presented here in the famous VT100 terminal, which was introduced in 1978 and became soon a universal standard. It provided many users their first ex­po­sure to interactive computing — an experience that might not have been far from what a real chat with a computer would mean today.

Electronic Computers Within The Ordnance Corps, The Computer Tree: The computer tree shows the evolution of electronic digital computers. The automatic computing and data processing industry is a direct outgrowth of research, sponsored by the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, which produced the ENIAC, the world's first electronic digital computer. This industry has grown to a multi-billion dollar activity that has penetrated every profession and trade in government, business, industry, and education.

Escuela Superior de Informatica - UCLM: 3D Blender retro computer models.

Magic-1: Magic-1 is a completely homebuilt minicomputer. It doesn't use an off-the-shelf microprocessor, but instead has a custom CPU made out of 74 Series TTL chips. Altogether there are more than 200 chips in Magic-1 connected together with thousands of individually wrapped wires. And, it works. Not only the hardware, but a full software stack. There's a ANSI C cross-compiler for Magic-1 (retargeted LCC), a fully multi-user, multi-tasking port of the Minix 2 operating system. a TCP/IP stack and hundreds of programs.

MOnSter 6502: A dis-integrated circuit project to make a complete, working transistor-scale replica of the classic MOS 6502 microprocessor.

Motherboard Graphics by Ron Reuter: Below are my graphics that I have completed so far of various “Retro” systems.

Naval History and Heritage Command: The First “Computer Bug”.

NES.css: NES.css is NES-style (8bit-like) CSS Framework.

Pocket Calculator Show: Pocket Calculator Show is our effort to provide and share memories and information on popular consumer electronics of the ’70s and ’80s, what we define as the “Golden Age” of electronics.

Rocky Bergen: Papercraft Models.

STAR WARS ASCIIMATION

Starring the Computer: Starring the Computer is a website dedicated to the use of computers in film and television. Each appearance is catalogued and rated on its importance (ie. how important it is to the plot), realism (how close its appearance and capabilities are to the real thing) and visibility (how good a look does one get of it). Fictional computers don't count (unless they are built out of bits of real computer), so no HAL9000 - sorry.

Telnet BBS Guide: The Telnet BBS Guide is the largest active listing of Dial-Up and Telnet accessible Bulletin Board Systems on the Internet!

The Glider: A Universal Hacker Emblem: When you put the glider emblem on your web page, or wear it on clothing, or display it in some other way, you are visibly associating yourself with the hacker culture. This is not quite the same thing as claiming to be a hacker yourself — that is a title of honor that generally has to be conferred by others rather than self-assumed. But by using this emblem, you express sympathy with hackers' goals, hackers' values, and the hacker way of living.

The Jargon File: This is the Jargon File, a comprehensive compendium of hacker slang illuminating many aspects of hackish tradition, folklore, and humor. This page indexes all the WWW resources associated with the Jargon File and its print version, The New Hacker's Dictionary. It's as official as anything associated with the Jargon File gets.

The Original 5¼" Disc Sleeve Archive: We currently have sleeves!

The Sounds of Dialup Modems and Related Equipment: The good old dialup modem. The bread and butter of internet access, of transacting data through simple plain old telephone wires. While the majority pay no real attention to how such a device works and just merely use it - I spent some time of my own building up collections of different modems and recording their signals. It turns out - there's some subtle differences between modems, and there's a whole plethora of different connection modulations which sound different. Throughout time - the pursuit for speed has changed the generally accepted modulation in use - where today, we reach our final dial up modulation - V.92. I only just recently changed from dialup to ADSL, and saw it befitting to present this collection of dialup sounds as a tribute to the dialup modem.

Things Every Hacker Once Knew: by Eric S. Raymond.

Visual6502.org: Visual Transistor-level Simulation of the 6502 CPU.

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